Monday, April 14, 2008

Uplift the Soul

"The mass of those to whom slavery was a dim recollection of childhood found the world a puzzling thing: it asked little of them, and they answered with little, and yet it ridiculed their offering. Such a paradox they could not understand, and therefore sank into listless indifference, or shiftlessness, or reckless bravado."

~~Of The Meaning of Progress, W.E.B. DuBois

Upon reading this, I pictured someone standing in some grassy, river-filled vale in between faded blue-gray mountains in the countryside, trying to figure out what he has to offer this world; what his real/true purpose is.

I would not say that he should forget about finding a purpose and just live for himself; there is a way out of this spiritual roadblock. In this book of essays, the one after the essay from which I quoted is all about how men forsake themselves to a breathing death by just making the primary incentive of their motives to appease their sensuous impulses (money, pleasure, etc.). He should not try to completely shun his sensuous impulses, but instead direct them to work in harmony with the rest.....the whole of his being.

It is through culturing the mind by formal and informal education that a person finds their self and their spiritual strength rises. Man should be working towards his ideal self, and helping others in their personal paths so that there is a national global progression towards better life and society.

Of course, there's much more to be said upon this ideology, but basically, when the man in the countryside takes the time to learn about the vale, the rivers, forests and wildlife, the mountains, the world outside of this area and his relation to all of this, he'll find that he has a lot more to offer than he thought he did.

4 comments:

  1. "when the man in the countryside takes the time to learn about the vale, the rivers, forests and wildlife, the mountains, the world outside of this area and his relation to all of this, he'll find that he has a lot more to offer than he thought he did."

    Alot was said with just a few words.

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  2. I concur with Disturbed :)

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  3. I also concur with disturbed. Those words really called out to me.

    Lovely post Clandestine. Lots to go on here ... few people in this world who remember that there is stuff for the natural world to teach us. Thoreau was a believer in this - pick up his work (if you haven't already) ... his work is still so relevant to our day ...

    "I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived." Henry David Thoreau (Walden)

    Some days ... blogs hearten me -- to see such like-minded people out there!

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  4. Don't Feed The PixiesApril 17, 2008 at 9:16 AM

    We forget in our climate-controlled, ready-meal convenience world that nature can be an enemy as well as a friend and we are best to keep that in mind.

    "If this is paradise, i wish i had a lawnmower" - David Byrne

    Humans change their world to suit them, but you are right to say that we should seek to understand the impact of that change first

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